Current Burn Restrictions

Governor Bentley Signs Drought Emergency Declaration, Bans Burning
in 46 Counties
.  The Remaining 21 Counties Placed Under Fire Alert.

MapMONTGOMERY – Governor Robert Bentley on Wednesday signed a Drought Emergency Declaration due to extremely dry conditions. The declaration, often referred to as a ‘No Burn Order’, prohibits all outdoor burning for 46 counties in north and central Alabama. The order is effective as of 3:00 p.m., Wednesday, October 12, 2016.
“The current drought condition in our state is posing a serious threat for wildfires,” Governor Bentley said. “The continued lack of rain combined with low relative humidity and strong winds put us at a very high risk. This declaration is meant to prevent unnecessary burning, reducing the chance of avoidable fires.”
The No Burn Order affects the following counties which have been upgraded from the previously-issued Fire Alert: Autauga, Bibb, Blount, Calhoun, Chambers, Cherokee, Chilton, Clay, Cleburne, Colbert, Coosa, Cullman, Dallas, DeKalb, Elmore, Etowah, Fayette, Franklin, Greene, Hale, Jackson, Jefferson, Lamar, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Lee, Limestone, Lowndes, Macon, Madison, Marion, Marshall, Montgomery, Morgan, Perry, Pickens, Randolph, Russell, Shelby, St. Clair, Sumter, Talladega, Tallapoosa, Tuscaloosa, Walker, and Winston.
Additionally, the Alabama Forestry Commission (AFC) has issued a Fire Alert for the remaining counties in south Alabama, effective immediately.
“We need rain desperately. Over the past couple of weeks we’ve seen an increase, not only in the number of wildfires, but also in the size of these fires. Several of them have been very large wildfires,” State Forester Gary Cole said. “With this extremely dry weather, conditions are such that any fire can quickly spread out of control, not only resulting in damage to our forests but also threatening and destroying homes. These burning restrictions are a necessary result of the ongoing lack of precipitation, the recent increased number of fires, high probability of fuel ignition, as well as the reduced availability of firefighting manpower and suppression resources across the state.”
Over the last seven days, 341 wildfires have burned over 4,100 acres in Alabama, according to Alabama Forestry Commission fire officials.

The Drought Emergency Declaration order will remain in effect until rescinded by the State Forester, at which time conditions will have changed sufficiently to reduce the occurrence and frequency of wildfires. To report persons burning in violation of this law, contact your local law enforcement.

Local County and City laws may also restrict outdoor burning.  Burners are responsible for contacting their local government for additional information.

ADEM Burning Bans

To assist in meeting regional air quality standards the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) implements summer open burning bans from May 1st thru October 31st in twelve Alabama counties: Baldwin, DeKalb, Etowah, Jefferson, Lawrence, Madison, Mobile, Montgomery, Morgan, Shelby, Russell and Talladega Counties.

What is banned? The open burning of untreated wood from construction or demolition and the open burning of vegetation from clearing or maintaining non-agricultural property. “Prescribed burning of agricultural or forestlands for silvicultural, agricultural or wildlife management purposes is allowed under the AFC Burn Permits for these counties.”

For more information contact Don Barron at 334-271-7879

Note: Jefferson County bans agricultural burning during these 6 months.

Additional Information:

- Fire Warning Descriptions
- National Weather Service - Watches, Warnings & Advisories 
- USDA Forest Service - National Forests in Alabama
- Alabama Department of Environmental Management